Summary of January State Board of Education Meeting

Wednesday & Thursday, January 5, 6, 2011

 

The State Board of Education met on Wednesday, January 5, 2011 in committees.  They began with the Leadership for Innovation Committee, Globally Competitive Students Committee, Healthy Responsible Students, 21st Century Professionals Committee, and ended with the Business/Finance and Advocacy Committee. On Thursday, they met to take Action on issues. Access to the SBE Executive Summaries and related documents are on the SBE website at the following link: http://www.ncpublicschools.org/stateboard/meetings/2011/01

Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Leadership for Innovation Committee Meeting

Action and Discussion Agenda

Discussion

  • LF1 Status of eTextbooks and Digital Teaching and Learning Resources in NC Public Schools The State Board received an update and discussed online resources and digital textbooks. The new assessments developed for ACRE will require online testing in 2013/2014.
  • Committee Meeting: Staff reviewed current efforts to move forward with digital technology in the schools. Many school systems are purchasing laptops, Kindles, iPads, computers, and other forms of technology, which can be used to access digital textbooks. NC has developed 8th grade NC History program with the support of LEARN NC and NCVPS. One of the main concerns, in moving to digital technology, is student access to technology and whether they have internet access in their homes. Lee County has implemented the purchase of laptops for all students in Grades 3-12. They redirected resources and funding priorities to purchase the computers. The new State Technology Plan is due every two years and will be ready by July 2011. The e-Learning Commission is set to release their report and recommendations for the state, in March 2011. Many LEAs already use various digital education tools including Charlotte-Mecklenburg, who subscribes to the “Discovery Education” a program for K-8 science curriculum. CMS students are showing gains in science, which may be attributed to this digital science curriculum. There are major cost implications for obtaining the technology hardware, software access, and maintenance for all students. The cost estimates were not provided. The textbook fund may be used for technology, but the State budget for textbooks was severely cut in 2009 and eliminated in 2010. It’s hard to say whether it will be cut again in 2011 with the budget crisis. Other strategies suggested to reduce costs include:  free curriculum and leased hardware. A Digital Leaning report prepared by the Foundation for Excellence in Education was provided and is available upon request.

New Business

  • NCVPS/LEO Director’s Update: Dr. Setser informed the Board that NC is one of two finalists for a grant from US Dept. of Education to study virtual education. He also indicated DPI staff has developed a new funding formula for virtual school courses and they will present to the State Board in February. There was discussion about the need for a Digital Education Summit possibly hosted by the JOBS Commission. The Race to the Top technology funding will be critical in moving NC forward in the digital education age.
  • Race to the Top Evaluation Questions: Dr. Henry reported to the State Board on the evaluation process required as part of the RttT grant. There are three contractors working on the evaluation process. There are six different initiatives to be reviewed. They need to determine if the efforts implemented in RttT are effective and cost sustainable. What should continue and what should end when the grant ends in four years? The longitudinal database will help with the data needed for the evaluation. Ultimately, they will be looking at teachers and student achievement. This will include classroom observations and require 18 months to complete the process. Other questions were raised including “Can we align our resources?” How are LEAs spending their funds? How are teachers performing who are rated low and high on their teacher evaluations?

Globally Competitive Students Committee

Action and Discussion Agenda

Discussion

  • GCS 1 North Carolina Extended Content Standards for Mathematics and Science The State Board will discuss the content standards being presented by grade level for Mathematics and Science. This effort was the result of collaboration between the Exceptional Children’s Division and the Curriculum Division. The Standards comply with NCLB and IDEA. The assessments will measure the achievement of students with the most cognitive disabilities, based on alternate achievement standards. This provides special education students (greatest cognitive disabilities) with a set of uniform content standards and clarifying objectives for Mathematics and Science.
  • Committee Meeting: The Common Core Standards are in place and the Extended Content Standards are an effort to help students with disabilities be successful and allow NC to assess these students. Several examples were provided and each was a direct result of the base content standard modified to the level of understanding for students with the most cognitive disabilities.  This will be back to the Board for Action and Approval in February.

Healthy Responsible Students Committee (11:35 AM)

Discussion

  • HRS1 Interscholastic Athletics The State Board will review a requested policy change and provide feedback. A small group of students was deemed ineligible to participate in athletics due to the change in the cut-off date for admission to kindergarten. Currently, the policy contains a note delaying implementation of the cut-off date until 2015-2016. The policy note should be deleted and this will allow all students who turn 19 before August 31 of their senior year to be eligible to participate in athletics. Deleting the note will also allow students who turn 19 before August 31, 2011 and beyond to be eligible to play interscholastic sports.
  • Committee Meeting: Staff reviewed the problem and there was no further discussion. This item will be on the action agenda in February.

21st Century Professionals Committee (2:10 PM)

Action and Discussion Agenda

Action

  • TCP 1 Recommendations from the Advisory Board on Requests for Exception from Teacher Licensing Requirements The State Board approves each request for exception from licensing, as recommended by the Board panel. In 2006, the Board appointed a panel to review requests for exemption to the licensing requirement or to provide an extension of time. The panel recommendations will be heard in Closed Session.
  • Board Meeting: No information was provided.
  • TCP 2 State Board of Education Recognition of North Carolina Board of Examiners for Speech and Language Pathologist and Audiologists (NCBOESLPA) Licensure as the Qualifying Credential for Service in Public Schools The State Board is asked to approve the proposal to recognize NCBOESLPA licensure as the qualifying credential required for service as a speech-language pathologists’ service in public schools. Presently, DPI has been licensing speech and language pathologists and is recommending moving to the more rigorous professional license standards, of the NC Board of examiners for Speech and Language Pathologists and Audiologists (NCBOESLPA). The Board requirements include: 1) completion of 75 semester hours of study in the field at an institution of higher education (IHE), 2) minimum score of 600 on Praxis II Speech Language Pathology, 3) completion of 30 hours of continuing education in the field every three years, and 4) renewal of license on an annual basis.
  • Committee Meeting: The Committee chair moved this item to closed session.
  • Board Meeting: The item was brought forward for discussion by the Committee chair. The main change would be the Praxis cut score which NC DPI sets at 550 while the NCBOESLPA license requires a 600 Praxis cut score. The Board discussed the issue and questions were addressed regarding existing licensed Speech and Language Pathologists and Audiologists being grandfathered to maintain their NC license to work in schools. Staff reassured the Board this would apply to new requests for licensure. This issue appeared as an agenda item and did not receive 30 days for LEAs to review for impact. Dr. Hoke requested information be gathered from Superintendents to determine if this change in licensure requirements would create problems with filling slots in this area of licensure. The problem with supply and demand was raised. The Board heard reports that the average Praxis cut score for this license is 673 of the 7500 who took the test. There is an 88 percent pass rate with 63 percent actually going to work in schools. They were also told of the 19 states that provide a license NC is one of 3 states with a cut score of 550 while all the others are 600. Seventy-three percent of licensed speech and language pathologists and audiologist hold a Board of Examiners license, which allows them to work in other areas beyond schools.

Business/Finance and Advocacy Committee Meeting (2:35 PM)

Action and Discussion Agenda

Action

  • TCS 1 Race to the Top (RttT) – Incentives to Support Teacher Recruitment and Retention in the Lowest achieving Schools The State Board did not approve the RttT incentives to support teacher recruitment and retention in the lowest achieving schools. In the RttT proposal, NC indicated they would provide every new teacher who choose to work in the lowest achieving schools, regardless of their entry into teaching, with a voucher that can be used for the following: 1) Forgiveness of student loans for each year of teaching, 2) Tuition for obtaining a Master’s degree in education, educational administration, or the content area in which they teach, and 3) Housing, or a combination of the three. The value of the voucher is equal to the cost of two semesters of coursework, two courses per semester at an in-state-degree granting program.

Committee Meeting: Not Discussed.

Action on First Reading

  • TCS 2 Approval of Grant
    • State Personnel Development Grant APPROVED North Carolina was awarded a five-year competitive grant (NC-SIP) for $7.4 million. The purpose of the grant is to establish and implement staff development support services to improve the performance (math and reading) and success of students with disabilities. There are four major goals for the grant: 1) improve math and reading skills performance for students with disabilities, 2) increase the percentage of qualified teachers if students with disabilities, 3) increase graduation rate and decrease dropout rates of students with disabilities, and 4) improve parent satisfaction with, and support of, school services for students with disabilities. Funds of $120,000 are being provided to start up the new grant sites in 2010-2011. Reading sites receiving $10,000 per year for five years include; Clinton City, Weldon City, Bladen County, Stokes County, Kannapolis City, Bertie County, and Richmond County. Math sites receiving $10,000 per year for five years include: Stanly County, Sampson County, Davie County, Henderson County, and Forsyth County.
  • TCS 3 Council on Educational Services for Exceptional Children The State Board APPROVED Deborah Armstrong Whitfield to fill the Council vacancy position of a parent of a child with disabilities. She resides in Charlotte and has a law practice and is founder and president of the Advocacy Institute, Inc. in Charlotte, NC.
  • BUDGET REVIEW (New Item): Philip Price provided a brief update to Board members on the State Budget for 2011-2012, when the 2011 Session of the General Assembly convenes January 26th. DPI provided 10 percent recommended cuts to Governor Perdue for 2011-2012. This would require $1.1 billion in reduced public school funding. The possible reversions of $60 million may not be possible and the lottery revenue shortfall is expected to reach $44 million which is a $20 million loss to public schools operating budget. K-12 funding accounts for 37 percent of the budget with all education groups accounting for 60 percent of the state budget. There is hope the growth in State funding will be higher than anticipated for 2011-2012 which may reduce the depth of the cuts slightly. Right now the growth is slightly better than expected for 2010-2011 which should remove the possibility of additional state budget cuts prior to June 30, 2011. The other major issue causing concern is the unemployment rate, which may continue to be a problem for the next 2-3 years. The ADM projection for 2010-2011 was too high especially for the urban systems, like Wake and Charlotte.  It is anticipated the 16,000 projected student increase for 2011-2012 will be adjusted, as the latest data from January enrollment is considered.

Update on Contracts

Contracts over $25,000 – 13 contracts

Contracts under $25,000 – 3 contracts

 

Thursday, January 6, 2011

State Board of Education Meeting, (9:00 AM) Dr. William Harrison, Chairman

  • Call to Order
  • Pledge of Allegiance:
  • Approval of Minutes

Special Presentation

  • Mr. William (Bill) P.  Tatum, Lee County Board of Education- State Board Advisor

Key Initiatives Reports and Discussion

Career, College, Ready Set, Go/Race to the Top Update-Mr. Adam Levinson gave an overview of the RttT efforts.

  • ACREDr. Angela Quick provided a handout and noted the work with other states on the Instructional Improvement System (IIS). A consultant contract will be finalized in January and will outline the technical specifications for the system.
  • Performance Navigator- Mr. Mike Martin reviewed the Proposed Measures and Targets for the State Board. These numerical goals are as follows: 1) Percent of students graduating from high school in 4 years, 2) Percent of students graduating from high school in five years (target increased), 3) Performance on National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 4) Students passing or excelling in both math and reading (target raised), 5) Scoring 3 or above on AP exams and percent of graduates taking the exam, 6) High school graduates who enroll in postsecondary programs, 7) LEAs requiring the Graduation Project, 8) SAT (ACT) composite and percent of graduates taking test, 9) Students completing concentration in a CTE, arts, language, or JROTC cluster, 10) Freshmen enrolled in at least one remedial course, and 11) Graduate passing Algebra II or equivalent. A list of the targets is available upon request and may be posted on DPI website. They have also changed the measurement standard for the number of conventional schools with a performance composite below 60 percent (previously known as low-performing schools) and they will include measurement of the validation of the educator evaluation process. This will involve a correlation between student growth and the teacher evaluation data. The SBE will use the information to set goals around teacher effectiveness in future years.

State Superintendent’s Report

  • Dr. June Atkinson provided a handout of key initiatives. At the Superintendent’s Quarterly meeting they discussed legislative issues and reached consensus on repealing the calendar legislation and returning authority back to the LEAs for setting the school calendar. The second consensus issue was to consolidate and modify legislation that requires schools and districts to develop multiple plans such as DSSF, School Improvement, etc. Though they did not have consensus, another issue arose with the superintendents regarding class size in K-12, where they would like to set the numbers for class size. Next Dr. Atkinson had a brief presentation on iTunes U, which stands for iTunes University. This is a collection of audio and video education files available through NC DPI. NCDPI and other partners in the state have developed this tool to provide teachers, students, parents, and others with the ability to download education materials for free. The iTunes U information can be found within the iTunes website, www.itunes.com. The educational contents can be downloaded to a PC, Mac, iPod, or iPhone. In the new digital age with students she believes this will be a place that will attract them, to retrieve information, to help them academically. NC was one of four programs highlighted nationally for direct certification of the National School Lunch Program. The School Lunch Program has reduced the administrative errors for managing and certifying students for free meals, thus providing significant cost savings to the LEAs. The entire report can be accessed at: www.fns.usda.gov/ora/MENU/Published/CNP/FILES/DirectCert2010.pdf.  Dr. Atkinson advised Board members of communication from US Dept of Education on the Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (NCLB). Three key areas are being discussed: 1) Flexibility in the Accountability System, 2) increase investment in principals and teachers, 3) Focus efforts on at-risk schools. More information will be shared in the coming months.

Board Meeting and Committee Chair Reports

Information Agenda

Healthy Responsible Students

  • HRS 2 Healthy Active Children Report 2010. The State Board heard information on the 2010 Healthy Children Report, required annually from the LEAs. The summary report includes information on the minutes of physical activity, including recess and trend data. The presentation slides are available in the link provided at the beginning of this preview. Eleven LEAs did not report information as required and the list is included in the report. Only 40 percent of the Healthy Advisory Committees list a representative, which is required and only 38 percent meet quarterly. Fifty-three percent provide their reports to the local boards of education. Fifty-one percent report ALL of their elementary schools provide 150 minutes of weekly PE with a certified PE teacher, while 48 percent report ALL of their middle schools provide 225 minutes of weekly Healthful Living with a certified health and physical education teacher. The remainder of the report provides further information on such items as: the use of the  Health Advisory report, health assessment tools being used, staff wellness program, percent of LEAs withholding recess as punishment, Health Advisory Commission training attended by LEA representative, and Joint-Use agreements.

Board Meeting: Dr. Paula Collins reviewed this annual report. All but one LEA has provided the required information for the report. The key pieces of the report can be found at the SBE link under HRS 2 listed at the beginning of this Summary. Board members discussed the possibility of having Individual Health Plans for all students with health issues. Dr. Collins indicated LEAs are only required to provide Diabetes Health Plans but some are doing it for their most vulnerable students anyway. Dr. Harris noted that teachers should be a model for their students. Many LEAs are focusing on physical activity and child nutrition in an effort to address the Obesity problems with children in NC. There was a brief discussion on teachers eliminating PE for children as a form of punishment or using PE as a form of punishment.  Both of which are not appropriate.

Consent Agenda

Globally Competitive Students

  • GCS 2 Changes and Clarifications to Policy GCS-A-012: Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives for NCLB Title III and Update to Title III State Plan The State Board APPROVED the amendments to Policy GCS-A-012 and the Title III Plan, which includes policy amendments. After collecting two years worth of data from ACCESS for ELLS assessment, used for specifying annual measurable objectives to determine the percentage of students making progress toward English Language proficiency. Policy changes are being recommended, including the targets for proficiency. They include the following: 1) AMAO 1. Students identified as limited English proficient shall demonstrate progress by achieving one or more of the following in terms of the overall composite proficiency score on the annual English language proficiency test: 1) increase to the next English language proficiency level; 2) increase the previous score by 0.5; or 3) reach the Comprehensive Objective Composite. The new proficiency targets are as follows: 2010-2011-55.1, 2011-2012-, 56.1, 2011-2013-57.1, and 2013-2014 58.1, with all succeeding years increasing by 1.0 point. The policy update and information on the cut scores is included in the GCS 2 executive summary link provided at the beginning of this preview.

Healthy Responsible Students

  • HRS 3 State Board of Education Study on Issues Related to Sports Injuries at Middle School and High School Levels The State Board ACCEPTED the study report as presented and to submit it to the General Assembly as required. The final report is due to the 2011 General Assembly upon convening.

21st Century Professionals

  • TCP 3 Proposed Qualifying Scores for Praxis II Physics (0265) and Regenerated Praxis II Exams in Elementary Education (0015) and Technology (0051) The State Board APPROVED, by consent, the qualifying scores recommended for Physics, Elementary Education, and Technology Education. NC is recommending a Physics test cut score of 133 after completing an in-state study conducted by the DPI Licensure Section. ETS conducted a standard setting process and has set a cut score of 161 for Elementary Education and a cut score of 159 for Technology Education. The new tests are for those individuals seeking a NC license in the above areas.
  • TCP 4 Proposed Qualifying Scores for Praxis II Art: Content and Analysis (0135) The State Board APPROVED, by consent, the new cut score of 161 for Art: Content and Analysis (0135). The new test and score is appropriate for the assessment of individuals seeking an Art Education license in North Carolina.

Leadership for Innovation

  • LFI 2 Approval of Charter School Technology Plans The State Board APPROVED, by consent, the charter school technology plans submitted by the following schools: Cape Fear Center for Inquiry, Tiler Charter, Socrates Academy, Gray Stone Day School, Bridges Charter, and ArtSpace Charter.

Business/Finance and Advocacy

  • TCS 4 School Bus Inspection Updates: Policy Regarding Preventive Maintenance and Vehicle Replacement Manual Updates (TCS-H-005) PULLED FROM THE AGENDA. The State Board is recommended to approve, by consent, the recommended policy changes for school bus inspections. In 2006, TCS-H-005 was adopted and covers preventive maintenance, vehicle replacement, and school bus inspections. A new policy, TCS-H-011, was adopted and transportation staff began reviewing the “INSPECTION” section of the old policy and identified the need for technical updates to the inspection procedures to include best practices, and acknowledge the latest technology, since adoption of TCS-H-005 in 2006. Policy TCS-H-005 also includes technical changes to the “VEHICLES” section, reflecting changes in school bus specifications, adopted since 2006.

Action and Discussion Agenda

Chairman’s Remarks

  • Dr. Bill Harrison, Chairman welcomed attorney Ann McColl as the new legislative liaison to the State Board of Education and indicated a memo would go out to all DPI staff to request any communications of staff with legislators be relayed to Ms. McColl. He also asked for the assistance of all education groups in supporting her and so that everyone is on the same page. He noted that The Community Colleges and Universities stay on message through the end of the legislative session and it is important all the education groups stay together for public schools as well.

Adjourn

 

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NCEducationPolicy.com’s 2010 IN REVIEW: Statistics and other Note-worthies from the past 12

The stats monkeys at WordPress.com have been feverishly tabulating, totaling, and compiling for nearly a week now and it’s finally complete!

Call it a ‘State of the Website’ if you like…. the following report details how NCEducationPolicy.comyour favorite source of Education News, and of course browser homepage — fared over the past 12 months.

So without further ado…  A relatively high level summary of the overall health of this blog:

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads This blog is on fire!. Healthy blog!

 

CRUNCHY NUMBERS:

Featured image

A helper monkey made this abstract painting, inspired by the rousing success of     NCEducationPolicy.com

The average container ship can carry about 4,500 containers. This blog was viewed about 14,000 times in 2010. If each view were a shipping container, your blog would have filled about 3 fully loaded ships.

In 2010, there were 92 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 203 posts. There were 3 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 172kb.

The busiest day of the year was April 20th with 221 views. The most popular post that day was Task Force on Childhood Obesity Commission Summary .

TOP REFERRING SITES: Many Thanks!!!

Top Referrers in 2010 were wral.com, search.aol.com, facebook.com, centurylink.net, and mariaozawa2u.blogspot.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for nc education budget, nc education budget cuts 2010, nc education policy, nc education budget cuts, and nc education budget 2011.

 

MOST VIEWED POSTS in 2010:

Though we love them all equally, the most popular posts were…

  1. Task Force on Childhood Obesity Commission Summary February 2010

  2. NC Education State Budget Cuts Proposed to the Governor (Updated) November 2010

  3. North Carolina Budget Deficit Continues to be Discussed 2011-2012: August 2010

  4. 2010 LEGISLATIVE STATE BUDGET MEMO #9 July 2010

  5. Task Force on Childhood Obesity Summary February 2010

Preview of January State Board of Education Meeting

Wednesday & Thursday, January 5, 6, 2011

The State Board of Education will meet on Wednesday, January 5, 2011 in committees.  They will begin with the Leadership for Innovation Committee, Globally Competitive Students Committee, Healthy Responsible Students, 21st Century Professionals Committee, and finish with the Business/Finance and Advocacy Committee. On Thursday, they will meet to take Action on issues. Access to the SBE Executive Summaries and related documents are on the SBE website at the following link: http://www.ncpublicschools.org/stateboard/meetings/2011/01

Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Leadership for Innovation Committee Meeting (10:30 AM)

Action and Discussion Agenda

Discussion

  • LF1 Status of eTextbooks and Digital Teaching and Learning Resources in NC Public Schools The State Board is requested to discuss and give feedback on the process for moving to more online resources and digital textbooks. The new assessments developed for ACRE will require online testing in 2013/2014. There must be a change to digital teaching and learning, which includes digital resources and other digital teaching tools. The Board will receive an update on the status and readiness to shift to online assessments and other possible changes.

New Business

  • NCVPS/LEO Director’s Update:
  • Race to the Top Evaluation Questions

Globally Competitive Students Committee (1:00 PM)

Action and Discussion Agenda

Discussion

  • GCS 1 North Carolina Extended Content Standards for Mathematics and Science The State Board will discuss the content standards being presented by grade level for Mathematics and Science. This effort was the result of a collaboration between the Exceptional Children’s Division and the Curriculum Division. The Standards comply with NCLB and IDEA. The assessments will measure the achievement of students with the most cognitive disabilities, based on alternate achievement standards. This provides special education students (greatest cognitive disabilities) with a set of uniform content standards and clarifying objectives for Mathematics and Science.

Healthy Responsible Students Committee (11:35 AM)

Discussion

  • HRS1 Interscholastic Athletics The State Board will review a requested policy change and provide feedback. A small group of students was deemed ineligible to participate in athletics due to the change in the cut-off date for admission to kindergarten. Currently, the policy contains a note delaying implementation of the cut-off date until 2015-2016. The policy note should be deleted and this will allow all students who turn 19 before August 31 of their senior year to be eligible to participate in athletics. Deleting the note will also allow students who turn 19 before August 31, 2011 and beyond to be eligible to play interscholastic sports.

21st Century Professionals Committee (2:10 PM)

Action and Discussion Agenda

Action

  • TCP 1 Recommendations from the Advisory Board on Requests for Exception from Teacher Licensing Requirements The State Board is requested to approve each request for exception from licensing, as recommended by the Board panel. In 2006, the Board appointed a panel to review requests for exemption to the licensing requirement or to provide an extension of time. The panel recommendations will be heard in Closed Session.
  • TCP 2 State Board of Education Recognition of North Carolina Board of Examiners for Speech and Language Pathologist and Audiologists (NCBOESLPA) Licensure as the Qualifying Credential for Service in Public Schools The State Board is asked to approve the proposal to recognize NCBOESLPA licensure as the qualifying credential required for service as a speech-language pathologists’ service in public schools. Presently, DPI has been licensing speech and language pathologists and is recommending moving to the more rigorous professional license standards, of the NC Board of examiners for Speech and Language Pathologists and Audiologists (NCBOESLPA). The Board requirements include: 1) completion of 75 semester hours of study in the field at an institution of higher education (IHE), 2) minimum score of 600 on Praxis II Speech Language Pathology, 3) completion of 30 hours of continuing education in the field every three years, and 4) renewal of license on an annual basis.

Business/Finance and Advocacy Committee Meeting (2:35 PM)

Action and Discussion Agenda

Action

  • TCS 1 Race to the Top (RttT) – Incentives to Support Teacher Recruitment and Retention in the Lowest achieving Schools The State Board is requested to approve the RTT incentives to support teacher recruitment and retention in the lowest achieving schools. . In the RttT proposal, NC indicated they would provide every new teacher who choose to work in the lowest achieving schools, regardless of their entry into teaching, with a voucher that can be used for the following: 1) Forgiveness of student loans for each year of teaching, 2) Tuition for obtaining a Master’s degree in education, educational administration, or the content area in which they teach, and 3) Housing, or a combination of the three. The value of the voucher is equal to the cost of two semesters of coursework, two courses per semester at an in-state-degree granting program.

Action on First Reading

  • TCS 2 Approval of Grant
    • State Personnel Development Grant North Carolina was awarded a five-year competitive grant (NC-SIP) for $7.4 million. The purpose of the grant is to establish and implement staff development support services to improve the performance (math and reading) and success of students with disabilities. There are four major goals for the grant: 1) improve math and reading skills performance for students with disabilities, 2) increase the percentage of qualified teachers if students with disabilities, 3) increase graduation rate and decrease dropout rates of students with disabilities, and 4) improve parent satisfaction with, and support of, school services for students with disabilities. Funds of $120,000 are being provided to start up the new grant sites in 2010-2011. Reading sites receiving $10,000 per year for five years include; Clinton City, Weldon City, Bladen County, Stokes County, Kannapolis City, Bertie County, and Richmond County. Math sites receiving $10,000 per year for five years include: Stanly County, Sampson County, Davie County, Henderson County, and Forsyth County.
  • TCS 3 Council on Educational Services for Exceptional Children The State Board is requested to discuss the Council vacancy and provide a recommendation to fill the position of a parent of a child with disabilities. Approval of the individual will occur at the February meeting.

Update on Contracts

Contracts over $25,000 – 13 contracts

Contracts under $25,000 – 3 contracts

Thursday, January 6, 2011

State Board of Education Meeting, (9:00 AM) Dr. William Harrison, Chairman

Call to Order

Pledge of Allegiance:

Approval of Minutes

Special Presentation

  • Mr. William (Bill) P.  Tatum, Lee County Board of Education

Key Initiatives Reports and Discussion

Career, college, Ready Set, Go/Race to the Top Update – Mr. Adam Levinson

  • District and School Transformation Update-Dr. Pat Ashley
  • Performance Navigator-Mr. Mike Martin

State Superintendent’s Report

  • Dr. June Atkinson

Board Meeting and Committee Chair Reports

Information Agenda

Healthy Responsible Students

  • HRS 2 Healthy Active Children Report 2010. The State Board will hear information on the 2010 Healthy Children Report, required annually from the LEAs. The summary report includes information on the minutes of physical activity, including recess and trend data. The presentation slides are available in the link provided at the beginning of this preview. Eleven LEAs did not report information as required and the list is included in the report. Only 40 percent of the Healthy Advisory Committees list a representative, which is required and only 38 percent meet quarterly. Fifty-three percent provide their reports to the local boards of education. Fifty-one percent report ALL of their elementary schools provide 150 minutes of weekly PE with a certified PE teacher, while 48 percent report ALL of their middle schools provide 225 minutes of weekly Healthful Living with a certified health and physical education teacher. The remainder of the report provides further information on such items as: the use of the  health advisory report, health assessment tools being used, staff wellness program, percent of LEAs withholding recess as punishment, health advisory commission training attended by LEA representative, and joint-use agreements.

Consent Agenda

Globally Competitive Students

  • GCS 2 Changes and Clarifications to Policy GCS-A-012: Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives for NCLB Title III and Update to Title III State Plan The State Board is requested to approve the amendments to Policy GCS-A-012 and the Title III Plan, which includes policy amendments. After collecting two years worth of data from ACCESS for ELLS assessment, used for specifying annual measurable objectives to determine the percentage of students making progress toward English Language proficiency. Policy changes are being recommended, including the targets for proficiency. They include the following: 1) AMAO 1. Students identified as limited English proficient shall demonstrate progress by achieving one or more of the following in terms of the overall composite proficiency score on the annual English language proficiency test: 1) increase to the next English language proficiency level; 2) increase the previous score by 0.5; or 3) reach the Comprehensive Objective Composite. The new proficiency targets are as follows: 2010-2011-55.1, 2011-2012-, 56.1, 2011-2013-57.1, and 2013-2014 58.1, with all succeeding years increasing by 1.0 point. The policy update and information on the cut scores is included in the GCS 2 executive summary link provided at the beginning of this preview.

Healthy Responsible Students

  • HRS 3 State Board of Education Study on Issues Related to Sports Injuries at Middle School and High School Levels The State Board is recommended to accept the study report as presented and to submit it to the General Assembly as required. The final report is due to the 2011 General Assembly upon convening.

21st Century Professionals

  • TCP 3 Proposed Qualifying Scores for Praxis II Physics (0265) and Regenerated Praxis II Exams in Elementary Education (0015) and Technology (0051) The State Board is asked to approve by consent the qualifying scores being recommend for Physics, Elementary Education, and Technology Education. NC is recommending a Physics test cut score of 133 after completing an in-state study conducted by the DPI Licensure Section. ETS conducted a standard setting process and has set a cut score of 161 for Elementary Education and a cut score of 159 for Technology Education. The new tests are for those individuals seeking a NC license in the above areas.
  • TCP 4 Proposed Qualifying Scores for Praxis II Art: Content and Analysis (0135) The State Board is recommended to approve by consent the new cut score of 161 for Art: Content and Analysis (0135). The new test and score is appropriate for the assessment of individuals seeking an Art Education license in North Carolina.

Leadership for Innovation

  • LFI 2 Approval of Charter School Technology Plans The State Board is requested to approve, by consent, the charter school technology plans submitted by the following schools: Cape Fear Center for Inquiry, Tiler Charter, Socrates Academy, Gray Stone Day School, Bridges Charter, and ArtSpace Charter.

Business/Finance and Advocacy

  • TCS 4 School Bus Inspection Updates: Policy Regarding Preventive Maintenance and Vehicle Replacement Manual Updates (TCS-H-005) The State Board is recommended to approve, by consent, the recommended policy changes for school bus inspections. In 2006, TCS-H-005 was adopted and covers preventive maintenance, vehicle replacement, and school bus inspections. A new policy, TCS-H-011, was adopted and transportation staff began reviewing the “INSPECTION” section of the old policy and identified the need for technical updates to the inspection procedures to include best practices, and acknowledge the latest technology, since adoption of TCS-H-005 in 2006. Policy TCS-H-005 also includes technical changes to the “VEHICLES” section, reflecting changes in school bus specifications, adopted since 2006.

Action and Discussion Agenda

Chairman’s Remarks

  • Dr. Bill Harrison, Chairman
  • Legislative Update

Adjourn

December Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee

Education Report Links

December 17, 2010

Comprehensive Arts Education Plan:

http://www.ncleg.net/documentsites/committees/JLEOC/Reports%20Received/2010%20Reports%20Received/Comprehensive%20Arts%20Education%20Plan%2012-2010.pdf

Diagnostic Assessment Pilot:

http://www.ncleg.net/documentsites/committees/JLEOC/Reports%20Received/2010%20Reports%20Received/Diagnostic%20Assessment%20Pilot%2012-2010.pdf

DWI Vehicle Forfeiture:

http://www.ncleg.net/documentsites/committees/JLEOC/Reports%20Received/2010%20Reports%20Received/DWI%20Vehicle%20Forfeiture%2012-2010.pdf

EARN Scholarship Fund Final Report:

http://www.ncleg.net/documentsites/committees/JLEOC/Reports%20Received/2010%20Reports%20Received/EARN%20Scholarship%20Fund-Final%20Report%2012-2010.pdf

Headcount of Limited English Proficient Students:

http://www.ncleg.net/documentsites/committees/JLEOC/Reports%20Received/2010%20Reports%20Received/LEP%20Headcount%2012-2010.pdf

Physical Education Scholarship Loan Program Final Report:

http://www.ncleg.net/documentsites/committees/JLEOC/Reports%20Received/2010%20Reports%20Received/Physical%20Education-Coaching%20Scholarship%20Loan-Final%20Report%2012-2010.pdf

Professional Standards Teaching Commission Report:

http://www.ncleg.net/documentsites/committees/JLEOC/Reports%20Received/2010%20Reports%20Received/Professional%20Teaching%20Standards%20Commission%20Report%2012-2010.pdf

SuccessNC:

http://www.ncleg.net/documentsites/committees/JLEOC/Reports%20Received/2010%20Reports%20Received/SuccessNC%2012-2010.pdf

Teacher Assistant Scholarship Loan Program:

http://www.ncleg.net/documentsites/committees/JLEOC/Reports%20Received/2010%20Reports%20Received/Teacher%20Assistant%20Scholarship%20Fund%2012-2010.pdf

Teacher Scholarship Loan Program:

http://www.ncleg.net/documentsites/committees/JLEOC/Reports%20Received/2010%20Reports%20Received/Teacher%20Scholarship%20Loan%2012-2010.pdf

Strengthen the NC School Funding System

Summary of Report by APA Associates

December 17, 2010

 

The General Assembly interim committee on Funding Formulas has met over the past two years and contracted with APA Associates to review the State’s funding formulas for K-12 education. The report was presented in early December 2010 to the committee.

 

APA was asked to: 1) Conduct a comprehensive review of the state education funding; 2) Evaluate the funding structure for education to determine whether it encourages efficient use of resources and determine if the funding system is too complex to be transparent and understandable,  and 3) Provide the strengths and weaknesses of the current education funding formulas.

APA conducted their research over the course of 7 months – from March to September of this year (2010) –  resulting in the following series of fiscally neutral modifications for consideration:

  1. Combine all allotments that are distributed on the basis of total enrollment in to a single per student allotment and give LEAs flexibility to use the funding as needed.
  2. Modify the Special Education Allotment by setting three different payment rates based on the severity of the disability and cost of each group.
  3. Modify the Low-Wealth County Allotment to create two distinct allotments on a simple formula basis or create a single formula similar to other states.
  4. Modify the At-Risk Student Allotment and the Disadvantaged Student Supplemental Fund Allotment by combining them and adjust distribution based on number of low-performing students or the number of Title I eligible students or eligible free and reduced lunch children.
  5. Modify the Small County Supplemental fund to focus exclusively on size of the LEA not the county.
  6. Change the way the Lottery Funds are distributed to support school buildings, to primarily wealth equalize paying for facilities.
  7. Modify Teacher allotment to change the way the number of state-paid teachers (allotted to each district) are calculated. Recommend using a student-weighted count, not ADM. Weighting for categories such as Special Education, At-Risk, LEP, Gifted students, and CTE students should be considered in the weighting.
  8. Modify Teacher Salary Schedule by adding other factors that impact teacher salary such as cost-of-living issues in various counties and incentives for teachers to work in districts that struggle to attract the best and brightest teachers.
  9. Modify the way Teacher Allotment Salaries are applied-The current system might be changed if the state were to pay a total amount to each district to cover the cost of teachers based on the number of eligible teachers multiplied by the statewide average  teacher salary with some specific adjustments based on factors in recommendation # 8.
  10. Modify the Teacher Salary Schedule Structure-Nationally changes are being considered for teacher salary schedules to include replacing education level with professional development plans, limiting experience, adding multiple responsibilities, leadership, days of work, student performance.
  11. Create a “Foundation” Formula- Set a base cost with adjustments for student and district characteristics.

The above recommendations are separate and distinct from one another and could be implemented individually, or simultaneously.  The final recommendations in the list subsume others that precede them. Further work will need to be completed to ensure that the cost of implementation would be fiscally neutral. The State’s current system could incorporate some or all of the recommended changes listed in this report to allow it to continue to evolve and improve.

 

Follow the link below for the complete report posted on the Committee website:

APA REPORT

http://www.ncleg.net/documentsites/committees/JLSCPSFF/Final%20Report/APA_PSFFFinalReport.pdf

Summary: November Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee

November 9, 2010

Co-Chairs Representative Yongue and Senator Foriest opened the meeting.

National Board Certification Program for Principals:

Joan Auchter, Chief Program Officer presented on the National Board Standards for Accomplished Principals. She reviewed the nine standards developed to become a National Board Principal. The standards are: Leadership for Results, Vision and Mission. Teaching and Learning, Knowledge of Students and Adults, Culture, Strategic Management, Advocacy, Ethics, and Reflection and Growth. More information can be found at the NBPTS website: www.nbpts.org. NBPTS is working with the Southern Regional Education Board to pilot the test. Currently, 19 states and 660 principals are in the field test pool. North Carolina has 59 principals from 37 counties involved (more than any other state). The purpose of the field test is to get feedback on the assessment and to establish scoring materials and a passing standard. Principals involved in the test are submitting all work electronically. When asked about how many principals may be successful in getting their certification, Ms. Auchter noted, that 4 out of 10 teachers gain National Board certification, but it’s too early to know the success rate for principals until the field tests are completed.

Kris Nordstrom fiscal analyst presented on the fiscal impact of implementing this certification program at the state level. Certain assumptions are necessary. First certification is only for principals (not assistant principals). Next the model developed assumes 1.5 percent of all state-funded principals will earn certification, and once certified they would receive a 12 percent salary increase. For purposes of this cost estimate principals would assume the cost for the application fees.  The estimated cost is $320,000 per year in state funds to support the salary increase. After ten years the cost would require $3.6 million in state funds based on the assumptions in the model.

Committee Discussion: There were questions about the NC counties where principals were participating in the field test, salary increases for principals who have a PhD, and how does the PhD program differ from NBPTS certification.  Could institutions of higher education provide some of these standards as part of the principal’s education program? Can undergraduate degree programs be combined with certification? Can we quantify savings at the school with a certified principal directing the school program? What possible savings (reduced costs) can be gained for improved education at the school? Will a certified principal improve the graduation rate? Who will monitor the data? Several members are concerned about adding a program to the state education budget and the costs associated with the new program.

Race to the Top:

Bill Harrison presented an overview of the slightly less than $400 million 4-year grant that North Carolina was awarded this year. He advised members the funds are only for four years and they would not be coming back to the state to request those dollars be put into the education budget at the end of the grant. The purpose of the grant is “Building Capacity.” He mentioned reading a recent Education Week article, where it was reported 75 percent of US students in 4th grade were proficient in meeting state reading and math standards, when looking at the same results for these students on international standards the results are not as high. The Common Standards will help get most of the States on the same page for Reading and Math. Finally, he told members competent caring teacher and principals are critical to the success of the NC RttT plan.

Dr. June Atkinson spoke on the RttT grant as well. She noted NC is one of 11 states to receive that grant and the grant funding will be a “Game Changer” for NC.  It will provide NC with the funding to move faster and further in their reform efforts. The two key goals of the grant are 1) Increase the Graduation Rate from 74.2 percent statewide to 85 percent and 2) Strong student Achievement. All 115 LEAs and 44 charter schools have just submitted their scope of work plans to access their portion of the RttT grant funding. Not all of the charter schools were eligible to submit plans because the grant is tied to the Title I program and not all charter schools have a Title I program. Dr. Atkinson also noted that there are 111 low-performing schools in the state who will be assisted with the RttT grant funding. The RttT grant is like a contract and if NC wants to make changes to the contract they will be required to get approval from US Educcation. Department (USED).

Mr. Adam Levinson the director of the grant presented some key facts on the grant. The LEA funding portion is $165 million with $35 million being set aside for the Technology “Cloud” program. The remainder of the funding $199 million will be used by DPI to implement 15 additional strategies listed in the table below as well as funding from administration for the grant:

 

Coordinator Initiative Objectives Budget
Peter Asmar

Philip Price

Technology Infrastructures and Resources 1) Establish Technology “cloud.”

2) Digital tools and resources to support RttT.

3) Prepare educators to use online resources and tools.

$34,639,376 from LEA resources
Martez Hill Evaluation and Policy Analyses 1)  Ongoing evaluations to improve RttT initiatives.

2)  Summative analyses for future program, policy, and funding decisions.

3)  Conduct analyses of NC policies to consider removal of policy barriers and development of policy reforms.

$9,498,277
Angela Quick Transition to new Standards and Assessments 1)  Gain stakeholder support for transition.

2)  Ensure teachers understand the new standards and assessments.

3)  Ensure Stakeholders understand and use summative assessments effectively.

Instructional Improvement and Professional development Budgets
Adam Levinson State Data Use 1)  Make NC data accessible to stakeholders.

 

2)  Ensure stakeholders are able to make use of the data.

3)  Data used to support decision-making and continuous improvement processes.

Professional Development Budget

 

 

 

 

Angela Quick Instructional Improvement System 1)  Increase the use of instructional improvement systems.

2)   Develop statewide instructional improvement system to support curriculum-embedded assessments, diagnostic assessments, curriculum monitoring, and summative assessments.

3)  Provide technology infrastructure to support instruction.

4)  Prepare teachers to make effective use of the instructional improvement.

5)  Improve student achievement outcomes.

$23,299,248
Lynne Johnson/  Rebecca Garland Teacher and Principal Evaluation processes 1)  Fully implement the NC teacher and principal evaluation processes. $5,320,100
Pat Ashely Performance incentives for lowest achieving schools 1) Opportunities to earn incentives based on student performance.

2)  Transition to classroom-level incentives by 2012-2013.

$19,048,745
Lynne Johnson/ Rebecca Garland Teacher effectiveness and evaluation planning 1)  Develop a state-level transparent system for integrating student achievement growth data into evaluations for all teachers and principals. $700,840
Lynne Johnson/

Bill Harrison

Regional Leadership Academies 1)  Increase the number of principals qualified to lead transformational change in low-performing schools and in rural and urban areas. $18,608,809
Lynne Johnson Expand Teacher recruitment and licensure programs 1)  Increase the number of Teach for America teachers in low-performing schools.

2)  NC Teacher Corps recruit college graduates to teach in low-performing schools.

3)  Induction support program for new teachers including, a 3-year support for teachers in low-achieving schools.

$20,244,287
Lynne Johnson Strategic staffing initiatives 1)  Support development, implementation, and evaluation programs to strengthen staffing in low-performing schools. $250,000
Bryan Setser NC Virtual Public School Expansion 1)  Expand availability of virtual courses in Math and Science for low-performing schools and other schools where curriculum may be limited. $6,456,023
Lynne Johnson Research on effective of teachers and principals 1)  Use data and lessons to make decisions about program improvements, expansion and closures. N/A
Lynne Johnson Professional Development 1)  Create, train, and support teachers and principals as professional development leaders to establish professional development capacity.

2)  Develop resources to support effective professional activities.

3)  Align professional development with reform initiative in RttT plan.

4)  Expand online professional development infrastructures.

5)  Evaluate professional development activities to determine impact on teaching practices and student achievement.

$37,027,995
Pat Ashley District and School Transformation System 1)    Improve performance of all low-performing schools to move all schools above 60 percent level. $41,980,147
June Atkinson Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics thematic schools and network 1)    Develop four coordinated STEM schools each focused on a major area relevant for NC economic development.

2)    Use anchor schools as centers for professional development, curriculum development, technology use, and innovation to impact networks of STEM schools throughout NC lowest-achieving schools.

$10,146,297

*Please note in preparing this overview the external partners who may receive contracts or who have contracts pending for the grant funds were not listed to simplify the table. If you would like a list of the partners please submit a request for the information.

 

The plan is to raise statewide achievement standards. The SBE provided updated student achievement targets at their November meeting last week. Each LEA and charter school will set their own targets based on their present student achievement levels. NC is anticipating release of the federal funding by early December. Staff noted the entire sum will be sent once the State plan is approved by USED. The LEAs will then have full access to their funding. All of the money could be used immediately or through the next four years.

Committee Discussion: Members raised concerns about the assessment inconsistency footnote. As tests/assessments change to match the new Common Core Standards curriculum, how can you correlate data on student test scores against older test data. Another member addressed the issue of using the Common Core standards. Overall, there appeared to be concerns about how the one-time $400 million funding would be spent, and who would monitor, and oversee the use of funds to ensure the goals were being achieved.

 

The Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee is scheduled to meet December 7th.

 

Summary of November State Board of Education Meeting

Wednesday & Thursday, November 3, 4, 2010

The State Board of Education met on Wednesday, November 3, 2010 in committees.  They began with the Globally Competitive Students Committee, 21st Century Professionals Committee, Leadership for Innovation Committee, and finish with the Business/Finance and Advocacy Committee. On Thursday, they met to vote.

CLICK HERE to visit the State Board Web site for access to Executive Summaries and related documents

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Globally Competitive Students Committee (10:00 AM)

Action and Discussion Agenda

Action

  • GCS 1 Future-Ready OCS: Proposed Change to Mathematics Graduation Requirement The State Board APPROVED the recommendation that students participating in the FR-OCS be allowed to substitute the mathematics course, Applied Mathematics II or the career/technical education course, Personal Finance (7066) for OCS Financial Management. Students in this program must complete three mathematics courses. They are required to complete: OCS Introduction to Mathematics, OCS Algebra I, and OCS Financial Management. DPI recommends students participating in this course of study, be allowed to substitute the mathematics course, Applied Mathematics II or the Career and Technical Education Course, Personal Finance, for OCS Financial Management. The Personal Finance Course aligns very closely with the OCS Course and both were developed using Blooms Taxonomy. The applied Mathematics II course, while not designed for students with disabilities, is helpful in teaching students, practical application. This will assist students in completing their graduation requirements and will also make it easier for school systems to comply with federal requirements of having a highly qualified teacher in every core content class.

Committee Meeting: No further discussion.

  • GCS 2 Textbook Evaluation Policies The State Board APPROVED staff recommendations for changes to amend Textbook Policies GCS-H-000, GCS-H-002 and GCS-H-007. The revisions are primarily to streamline the language. The proposed policy changes are as follows; GCS-H-00 will be changed to require the schedule for the evaluation process to be included in the “Invitation to Submit Textbooks” document, GCS-H-002 will require the procedures for the regional textbook evaluation to be included in the “Invitation to Submit Textbooks” document, and GCS-H-007 is revised as the “Textbook and Evaluation Adoption” policy. A copy of this policy will be available online in the Executive Summary link.

Committee Meeting: Brief overview, no further discussion.

Action on First Reading

  • GCS 3 2010-2011 Invitation to Submit Textbooks for English Language Arts for Evaluation and Adoption in North Carolina The State Board APPROVED the invitation for evaluation and adoption of textbooks. The invitation is for English/Language Arts and includes rules and regulations based on General Statutes, Administrative Code, and State Board Policy that govern the adoption process.

Committee Meeting Board member Tate asked about the efforts to move to more digital books. Staff is expecting digital proposals, but until all students have access to computers it makes it hard to convert to all digital. Staff indicated digital adoptions have occurred with Career and Technical courses, primarily.

Discussion

  • GCS 4 Credit Recovery The State Board reviewed the proposed amended policy Credit recovery has become increasingly difficult due to the expansion of courses and delivery methods. Credit recovery may be for full course recovery or partial recovery courses. Policy changes will be implemented for 2011-2012 school year. The policy has seven new defining and clarifying sections; 1) definition of the term “credit recovery,” refers to a block of instruction less than the entire Standard Course of Study which means  credit recovery delivers a subset of the actual course to address student deficiencies, 2) define “repeating a course for credit” will be used to refer to high school course repeated via any delivery method when the Standard Course of study for the course is being taught for a second time, 3) define “repeating a course of credit” will allow students to receive a grade and take the associated EOC. Students who have already made a Level III of IV may use the score as 25 percent of the final grade or retake the test. If the student retakes the test then the higher of the two scores will be used in calculating the final grade, 4) LEAs shall give a pass/fail for each credit recovery course and this will not impact a student’s GPA, 5) students who wish to modify their GPA may repeat the course for credit and not seek a credit recovery solution, 6) local boards may not limit the number of credit recovery courses taken by a student prior to graduation, 7) the EOC test associated with credit recovery shall be administered upon completion of the credit recovery course and no later than 30 calendar days. There is also a “Credit Recovery” briefing paper and a “Frequently Asked Questions” document. The documents are included in the Executive Summary link at the beginning of the preview.

Committee Meeting: Extensive discussion was held about the process for developing the policies under consideration. The purpose for the policy is get consistency across the LEAs with credit recovery since many different things are occurring in the field. Members discussed whether credit recovery should be allowed for course failings due to attendance problems. A question was raised about the NC High School Athletic Association’s position on the policy and credit recovery. Members were told they support the proposal. Board members had many questions including why LEAs do not participate in credit recovery. Is there a way to require LEAs to offer credit recovery? The SBE can set their policy to require LEAs to use the program. The difficulty arises with, making course schedules, the need for additional supervisory personnel for the program, and the fiscal impact for providing credit recovery (including the cost of the courses). Board members want to see it in all NC high schools, since it should improve the graduation rate. The graduation rate is an important issue for the success of high schools and their students and is part of NC education goals.

  • GCS 5 Blue Ribbon Task Force Report on Studying Impacts of Raising Compulsory Attendance Age State Board members reviewed the report required by the 2010 Session Law. The task force studied the impact of raising the compulsory attendance age to 17 or 18. Four questions were posed for a response. The report shall be submitted by November 15th to Joint Legislative Commission on Dropout Prevention and Graduation as well as the Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee. The complete report can be accessed by following the link to the Executive Summary listed above. Key Recommendations: 1) increasing the attendance age can only be successful if supplemental programs are in place targeting at-risk students, 2) a larger more comprehensive study should be conducted within the context of law enforcement and juvenile justice, 3) eight pilot programs should be  conducted, one in each region of the state giving the LEAs the flexibility to develop the pilot based on the unique needs of their student body and, 4) regardless of the whether the age is raised, consistent ongoing teacher training supplemental programs relevant to students and curriculum material are critical. The conclusion in the report states North Carolina needs to improve on successes of the past in providing students with skills and habits to meet and exceed graduation requirements. The system needs to improve by examining current practices and policies, hiring and retaining great teachers and leaders along with working with businesses and other agencies. A copy of the report is available in GCS5 at the link, noted at the beginning of the preview.

Committee Meeting: A Blue Ribbon Task Force was appointed and met two times to respond to the legislative study. The main recommendation was for another task force to be appointed and spend one year studying the overall impact (including fiscal) of this change. Twenty-six states have an age of 18 for attendance, 8 states have 17 years of age, and 24 states have 16 years of age. One issue raised was will increasing the attendance age increase the graduation rate and if you don’t change your practice for at-risk students they will just disrupt learning for everyone. Eight LEAs in Florida had pilots to increase the attendance age. Staff reported these were very successful. There appears to be grass roots support to increase the age. The task force recommended pilots in eight regions of the State. The report is due November 15th. Board member McDevitt said the lack of a clear recommendation to change the age was simply we “kicking the can down the street,” and the SBE needed to either phase-in the compulsory attendance age increase or require it on a date certain. Dr. Atkinson noted the cover letter with the report could indicate the board’s determination to move forward and increase the age for attendance. Dr. Harrison asked if the Blue Ribbon Task Force, could expand the group with people from NCASA, NCSBA, and NCAE, and finish their work in 6 months answering many of the questions left unsettled with the two Fall meetings. Chairman Harrison requested the Task Force review the states with higher age attendance requirements to determine whether raising the attendance age is effective in increasing the graduation rates and if there are any other issues to be addressed with this age change.

  • GCS 6 Senate Bill 66 Arts Education Task Force Recommendations The State Board  reviewed the report from the Arts Education Task Force that was appointed this year to address several issues. The issues considered were as follows; 1) policies to implement arts education in public schools including an art requirement in grades k-5, 2) availability of all four arts disciplines in grades 6-8, with students required to take one arts course in each school year, and 3) the availability of electives in the arts at the high school level. In addition, the Task Force shall look at a high school graduation requirement in the arts and further development of the A+ Schools Program.  Recommendations shall be submitted to JLEOC by December 1, 2010.

Committee Meeting: Dr. Garland discussed the report. They reviewed adding an arts course as a graduation requirement and looked at A+ schools expansion. They studied the information on arts education in elementary and middle schools. They plan to complete their report on December 1 to submit to the legislature. The report includes several recommendations: 1) implement K-5 arts instruction every year, 2) no consensus was reached on requiring an arts course for graduation from high school, 3) broaden the A+ schools program through a phase in approach, 4) expand arts exposure for all students and teachers using community resources. Other recommendations include staff development in the arts for all staff, accountability by creating incentives for schools to include arts education, funding resources should be identified, and arts integration personnel are needed at DPI and for the A+ schools.  Board members were told 75 percent of high school students already take a high school arts course, annually.

  • GCS 7 K-12 Social Studies Essential Standards The State Board discussed Version 2 of the Social Studies standards. The Standards are available for feedback though November 10th. They can be found at http://www.publicschools.org/acre/standards/phase2.

Committee Meeting: Staff presented an overview of the latest Social Studies curriculum draft. The National Council of Social Studies states: Social Studies is the “integrated study of the social sciences and humanities to promote civic competence.” Over the past eighteen months staff and others have prepared this latest draft for the curriculum. A draft released earlier this year had major changes and was met with very negative responses from the community including the legislature. Literacy standards are embedded in the social studies program as well as character education, NAEP standards, and financial components. Extensive feedback was received before completion of this latest version. The instruction will begin in K-3 with establishing the foundation for Social Studies, 4th grade will be a study of North Carolina, 5th grade US History, 6th grade World Geography, History and Culture, Beginnings of society through the first Global Age, 7th grade Modern Civilization, Global Convergence through the present, 8th grade is NC and US History, 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th grade will have two US History courses (Part 1 and 2), Civics and Economics, and World History. The plan is to require four History courses for graduation (presently there are only 3 courses required). The intent is to include new electives related to History: Psychology, Sociology, 21st Century Geography, The Cold War, Turning Points in American History, 20th Century Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, World Humanities Seminar, and American Humanities Seminar. As part of the accountability for the new curriculum they plan to use an essay test rather than the standard multiple choice. They are recommending a “documents-based” exam to test the student’s knowledge of early founding documents (Federalist Papers). They could have these exams ready as soon as 2012, and they would use teachers from other districts to grade the papers. This would address the concern about the multiple choice bubble tests that do not require critical thinking. Input is still being received on this draft through November 10th.

21st Century Professionals Committee (1:00 PM)

Action and Discussion Agenda

Action

  • TCP 1 Revision of Board Policy to Reflect Changes in the Beginning Teacher Support Program The State Board APPROVED changes to the Board policy regarding the Beginning Teacher Support Program. Each LEA develops a program/plan for beginning teachers, which is approved by the local board, reviewed, and monitored. There are a series of changes to Policy TCP-A-004, including, but not limited to, the five-year formal review and an annual review process as recommended by the mentor task force. Other changes in the policy address changing the word Individual Growth Plan to the Professional Development Plan. Other changes include working conditions for beginning teachers, local board plan approval, annual peer review and information on the five–year formal reporting requirements. A copy of the policy is available at the Executive Summary link at the beginning of this preview.

Committee Meeting: The policy will provide needed changes and support for beginning teachers. Board members requested information on the number of teachers who complete three years of teaching, but fail to get their Professional 2 license.

Discussion

  • TCP 2 Recommendations from the Advisory Board on Requests for Exception from Teacher Licensing Requirements The State Board is requested to approve the actions related to each request. The panel recommendations are presented to the SBE in closed session.

Leadership For Innovation Committee Meeting (1:30 PM)

Action and Discussion Agenda

Action

  • LFI 1 Final Decision in Contested Case
    • North Carolina Marine Sciences High School, Inc. (Cape Lookout) 10 EDC 1104 The State Board issued a final agency decision in the contested case. The State Board decided to non-renew the charter for Cape Lookout. The administrative law judge recommended renewing the charter for Cape Lookout through June 30, 2012. The respondent has filed exceptions. This is a closed session item.

Board Meeting: Move to amend the ALJ findings and reject their decision and reaffirm the SBE decision to close Cape Lookout due to excessive dropouts.

New Business

  • Technical Readiness for Online Assessment:
  • NCVPS/LEO Director’s Report: Brian Setser presented on NCVPS and mobile learning. Mobile lessons for online courses was tested this fall. The SAT prep lesson was piloted. There is also a list through NCVPS of mobile course options.

Business/Finance and Advocacy Committee Meeting (2:10 PM)

Action and Discussion Agenda

Action

  • TCS 1 2011-2013 Biennial Budget Expansion Request The State Board APPROVED the expansion budget needs as listed. The expansion budget requests for 2011-2013 are due to OSBM on November 12, 2010. There is a list of nine expansion items: 1) $304,774,366-LEA Adjustment/Discretionary Reduction, 2) $19,722,637-Ready Set Go-Fund all 8th graders to take EXPLORE assessment, 10th graders to take PLAN, and 11th graders to take ACT. Also funding for “Boot Camp,” and alternate assessments, 3) $477,267-Restore Governor’s School funding, 4) $247,650-Web Services-fund the public schools website, 5) $173,421 Internal Audit-add two internal auditors, 6) $995,300 Learn and Earn High Schools, 7) $41,156-Technology Services Time Tracking, 8) $589,210 Update Wiring in education building, 9) $20,000,000-Healthy Student’s Initiative by supporting school lunch programs. The expansion items total $347,021,007. In calculating the 5, 10 and 15 percent cuts to public schools the amounts were included in the documents. The amount for 5 percent is $418,512,811, 10 percent is $837,025,621 and 15 percent is $1,255,538,432 and these figures do not include the $304 million of the discretionary cut. The cuts to DPI for the percentages are as follows: $2,164,334, $4,328,668, and $6,493,002. A complete copy of these documents is in the Executive Summary link.

Committee Meeting: Philip Price reviewed the budget issues for board members. School districts have a recurring $304 million annual reversion required. In 2010, the LEAs returned 3,200 teaching positions as well as principals, assistant principals, and instructional support personnel to meet this annual cut. Staff has taken the $304 million and added the requested 5 percent reduction for a total of $700 million equaling a 9 percent reduction. There was no recommendation on specifically where the cuts can be made for the upcoming budget session. If you remove all teachers from possible cuts more than 50 percent of the state public school fund is spent on teachers and this would only leave 50 percent of the budget for major cuts. Personnel will definitely be impacted to reach meet the potential cuts requested of 5, 10, and 15 percent. The State deficit could be as high as $3.6 billion next school year. The deficit includes the federal stimulus funds no longer available to the states, State taxes that expire, and over $400 million in non-recurring cuts placed back in the public school budget for 2010-2011, such as textbooks. At DPI every 5 percent cut will require cutting 25 jobs. All state agency cuts are due by Friday, November 5 to the state budget office. Questions were raised about the expansion items included in this item. The expansion items are listed above and the main question dealt with the “Boot Camp” funding and the name change of the program.

Board Meeting: Expansion items must be made in priority order by mid-November. The Board voted to approve the list as presented by staff without further discussion.

  • TCS 2 Revisions to Benefits and Employment Policy Manual 2010-11 for Public School Employees The State Board APPROVED 17 revisions to policy TCP-D-003. Changes are being made to the following sections: 1.1.9– Define “bona fide volunteer” 1.1.12 Clarify definition of immediate family for FMLA, 3.1.3 Coordinate FMLA changes for vacation leave, 4.1.2 Clarify when FMLA emergency leave applies for sick leave, 4.1.8 +10 Leave reinstatement change (63 months), 4.2.1 Extended Sick Leave-track license name (media coordinator), 4.3.2 Clarify exhaust available leave under voluntary shared leave, 4.3.4 Non-family donation of sick leave under voluntary shared leave, 4.3.7 Voluntary Shared Leave-Unused Leave returned to donors,  5.1.1 Personal Leave-Track license name (media coordinator), 5.1.2 Track changes in statute under personal leave, 8.1.2-28 Track FMLA Regulations & NDAA, 14.1.2 -5 Track Changes in Statute for Probationary Teachers, 14.2.3-11 Add Media Specialist & use Career Status, 15.1.1 Track Changes to Statute School Calendar, 16.1 Legislation eliminated these provisions for retired teacher employment, 16.2.1-5 Track legislation & update data & numbering for employment of retirees. A copy of these changes is available in the Executive Summary link in the opening paragraph under Section TCS 2.

Committee Meeting: Federal law, federal regulations, and state law changes have resulted in the necessary changes listed above. No further discussion.

Action on First Reading

  • TCS 3 Schools Selected from Applications for Reading Diagnostic Initiative The State Board APPROVED the list of schools that volunteered and were then chosen to participate in the Reading Diagnostic Program. There are 183 schools participating in Governor Perdues’ Reading Diagnostic Program. There were 27 pilot schools last year and 156 schools were added at the beginning of this year (73 Reading First Schools and 83 invited schools). Invitations were sent to superintendents and others to become part of the initiative. DPI received 368 applications and there is space for 200 more schools to join the program. The new schools will train in November /December and begin the first benchmark assessments in mid-January. A list of the schools is included in the Executive Summary with the link provided in the opening paragraph, Section TCS 3.

Committee Meeting: Staff reviewed the history of the schools who are in the program (information listed above). A new updated list was provided to Board member with a total of 238 schools to be added (38 more). There are more than 1500 elementary schools statewide who can participate in the program. They showed where the schools are in the counties and staff hopes to return next month with more schools depending on funding availability. Fifteen districts do not have any schools in the program. Some of these counties include: Wilkes, Davidson, Randolph, Jones, Johnston, Pender, and Buncombe. Chairman Harrison indicated most, if not all, of the LEAs already have programs they are using or have recently purchased technology and software.  Therefore they do not want to switch at this time. Chairman Harrison has sent word they have one year to show the value of their program before they will have to add schools from their LEA to the new reading diagnostic initiative.

Discussion

  • TCS 4 Reappointment or Replacement of Compliance Commission Members, Appointment of a New Chairperson, and Amendments to Policy TCS-B-00 The State Board discussed the recommendations for reappointments and for new members of the Compliance Commission as well as the amendments to policy TCS-B-00. David Jenkins, Martin County, reappointment, Cindy Goodman, Scotland County for reappointment, Heidi Von Dohlen, Buncombe County for reappointment, Wanda Bunch Business Representative for reappointment, replace Max Walser with Kelly Lynn Blain, Person County teacher, and Stewart Hobbs Jr. Stokes Superintendent as Chairman. Policy changes include; 1) Removing authority for Commission to deny appeals of schools that want a field testing exemption for a specific school year, 2) Commission shall meet annually and notification of meetings for State Board is no longer required, 3) Eliminate the absence rule which notes three consecutive absences shall constitute resignation of commission member.

Committee Meeting: Staff presented the names of the individuals listed above for the Compliance Commission and the change to the policy. There are four more names needed and the Board plans to approve all the commission members at their December meeting.

  • TCS 5 DHHS Transition Plan for Organizational Structure and Student Instructional Services at the Residential Schools The State Board reviewed the plans and provide recommendations for the final plan to be approved in December. Effective June 30, 2011, DPI will have responsibility for the total services, staff, programming and facilities at the three NC residential schools. The plan envisions four staff members to serve as the central office for the three schools and to oversee all activities at the schools. The plan must be submitted to several legislative committee of the General Assembly by December 1, 2010. The plan addresses a series of requirements set in Session Law 2010-31. The executive summary contains organizational charts and other documents detailing the plan to be considered by the State Board. This item will be on Action in December.

Committee Meeting: Staff began discussing the work to meet the state law requiring DPI to assume responsibility for the three residential schools in NC. They reviewed the process and all their work with DHHS previously and up to this point. Board members will need to approve the final plans in December. Staff discussed two different plans with respect to the schools. Plan 1 would leave the three schools to serve students as they currently do and then appoint a Human Rights Commission to deal with all grievances. Plan 2 would consolidate the three schools and locate all the students as space permits at the Governor Morehead School in Raleigh. The other two schools would be used as resource centers for the students and many of the students at those schools would likely stay in their districts and attend their local school and use the resource center as needed. Organization charts were shared with the Board. Board members discussed the recommendation to consolidate the school at the Governor Morehead School, while Wilson is the newest and largest school and Morganton was recently renovated. Staff indicated it was merely proximity to DPI. Ms. Watson discussed the academic issues with these schools and shared data on reading and math scores for students at the various schools. As an example some of the test scores in the residential schools compared with the scores of similar students in public schools were as much as 20 to 40 percentage points lower in the residential schools. The goal is to improve the scores by 10 percentage points next year. Dr. Ashley and the Transformation group has been asked to evaluate the schools because the scores are so low. The schools will be treated as low-performing schools. There are fifteen hospital schools who will continue to be supervised by DHHS, but DPI is coordinating on the academic aspects of the hospital facilities (i.e.  O’Berry, Whitaker, etc.). In addition, the organization charts are not changing except that each school will have a principal. The director has too many responsibilities running the residential facility to handle academics, and so the principal is needed to manage the student’s instructional program. The Board will also need to provide direction on Plan 1 or 2 with staff soon.

Update on Contracts

Contracts over $25,000 – 25 contracts

Contracts under $25,000 – 15 contracts

Thursday, November 4, 2010

State Board of Education Meeting, (9:30 AM) Dr. William Harrison, Chairman

Call to Order

Pledge of Allegiance: Mr. Reginald Kenan

Approval of Minutes

Special Recognition-Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching

  • 2009 Awardee in 7-12 Science
    • Ms. Judith Jones, Chapel Hill/Carboro Schools
  • 2009 Awardee in 7-12 Mathematics
    • Ms. Maria Hernandez, Math, NC School of Science in Mathematics
  • 2010 Finalists in K-6 Mathematics
    • Ms. Amanda Northrup, Haywood County Schools
    • Ms. Rebecca Pearce, Guilford County Schools
    • Ms. Penelope Shockley, Chapel Hill/Carboro
  • 2010 Finalists in K-6 Science
    • Ms. Zebetta King, Wake County Schools
    • Ms. Amanda McLean, Caldwell County Schools

Key Initiatives Reports and Discussion

Early Childhood Education Study (More At Four) – John Pruitt presented the results of the external evaluation of More at Four Program. Ten years of research in program is not complete. Seventy-five percent of the children being served in More at Four are below the poverty level. The majority of students in More at Four have never been served in any early childhood care setting. The latest study tracked the learning gains of students who started in More at Four through the third grade. Past evaluations have shown high quality pre-kindergarten and having highly qualified teachers in the classroom children show greater gains in knowledge. Learning growth is above average in literacy, language, math and social skills. Longitudinal studies have shown that the program has produced accelerated learning into Kindergarten. The question is “Do these effects persist years after they enter school?” The legislature wanted to find the impact of More at Four children in 3rd grade Reading and Math EOG (four years after the students were left the program). The evaluation indicated children had achieved statistically significant scores compared to similar economically disadvantaged children who were not served in More at Four. The data clearly shows the third grade test scores gap between poor children in the More at Four program and middle class children had significantly been closed by as much as 37 percentage points in Reading (2006-2007), 24 percent Reading (2007-2008) and 31 percent in Math (2006-2008). How do we maximize our investment in pre-K? Strengthen the public Pre-k program for our most vulnerable children. Efforts to align curriculum standards for K-3 and More at Four are critical going forward. The next step is to further evaluate learning growth and this report will be released in early 2011. Random assessment of students may be done in the future, but it has not been done nationally. This would be a significant study. Board members are concerned the charts and data are not clear and needs to be simplified for the legislature and other outside groups. Reading assessment changed and so they were separated, but Math was combined. Questions arose regarding the waiting list and who is eligible to apply for slots in the program. There is a rigorous methodology for admitting children, but there are still waiting lists for the program. Many children are not being served. Funding for the More at Four has been cut $10 million in recent years as well as major cuts to the Smart Start program. The results of the study need to be communicated clearly to members of the public to show the lasting gains for students who enter the More at Four program.

Career College Ready Set Go/Race to the Top Update – Mr. Adam Levinson said the Race to the Top website is being used in the LEAs. He presented an overview of the Race to the Top work. There are many aspects of the effort and they include: ACRE, District Transformation, Education Technology Cloud, and Professional Development Plan. There are two key deadlines: by November 8 each LEA and charter school will submit a detailed scope of work plan and the state scope of work will need to be submitted by November 22 to USED (US Education Department). Communication (website) is critical piece of work and needs to include everyone in education across the State. Twenty-three sessions were recently held to discuss completing the LEA plans across the State.  A presentation will be given to Joint Legislative Education Oversight next week. RTT is a four-year plan with possible modifications in the process as it goes along. Significant contracts will need to be completed to stay on schedule.  The Education Cloud Technology Initiative was presented by Peter Asmar. Key pieces of this project include: equity of access to systems, data tools, having a common platform, and the cost savings associated with shared technology. All LEAs are connected and so there are shared services, and the Cloud will be an opt-in to participate with the technology and software, which will ultimately save substantial funds. The Cloud creates capacity for the LEAs to access technology and programs without significant cost. IT Management, is an example of one program and LEAs can pick and choose different services (opt in process). LEAs only pay for the services they decide to use. Lt. Governor Dalton wants to see access for K-20 so more can be shared, with greater cost savings and efficiency. K-20 synergy is critical to saving funds and linking data. Funding could be provided through the State General Fund to add more software options. Lynn Johnson presented on the Professional Development Initiative. She will employ a system that helps teachers apply the new skills needed and deliver this assistance in a blended approach. The focus is to use the two-year work effort on common core and essential standards, including using the toolkits (NC FALCON) to train teachers and administrators. Formative and Summative Assessments are critical. There is a need to keep changing if it is not working and data will be the driving force for decision-making. Team teach, talk, and make changes. This will be a mindset shift and it must be systemic. Identify distinguished leaders, master principals to participate in regional (4) learning sessions. Staff is now focused on ramping up to hire people to get the work done over the next four years and when four years are gone the contracts for the work are over.

Performance Navigator Update – Mike Martin updated the members. Two things are the primary focus for 2010-2011, modifying what we measure and modifying the targets. The key will be measuring the Race to the Top targets. Some of these targets include the four-year cohort graduation rate, NAEP scores, percent of students scoring on AP exams, participation rates in AP courses, percent of graduates going on to post secondary education, ACT measure, and percent of freshman in one remedial course. Some of the new targets include the following: percent of students excelling on math and reading EOG/EOC (raise targets), low-performing schools, educator evaluation data. Raise the Grade 4 Math target 2.0 points up to 85 for 2010-2011. Grade 4 Reading is increased from 71.6 percent to 74.6 percent for 2010-2011. All the key targets are being increased for this school year. How do we measure low performing schools success?  The plan is to move from using the number of low performing schools to using the number of schools with performance composites below 60. It is important to measure of all of our efforts. Subsequently, the teacher evaluation data will be used to measure the validity and use of the tool with respect to student test scores and growth. The plan is to determine the degree to which the tool is being used effectively in evaluating teachers. Does the teacher evaluation instrument data link with student growth. One board member reminded staff not to leave teachers out who don’t administer EOCs or EOGs in their teaching. These teachers have no student test score data to use in validating their evaluation.

Information Agenda

Globally Competitive Students

  • GCS 8 Diagnostic Assessment Review for the 2009-2010 Reading and Math Pilots The State Board will receive information on the 13 schools involved in the Math pilots. The Math assessments used were Assessing Math concepts with Math Perspectives (K-1). The pilot schools were trained in the late Fall 2009 and teachers began benchmarking students with the mid-year assessments. End-of Year assessments were given in May. UNC Chapel Hill evaluated the reading pilot schools and a doctoral candidate evaluated the Math pilot schools. The reports are included in the Executive Summary, which is provided in the link at the beginning of this preview.

Board Meeting: Carolyn Guthrie presented on the pilots (2nd year) on how this program is critical to dropout prevention.  Reading (K,1, and 4) train the trainer to get pilots started. The pilots are centered around technology and how it helps to do these assessments. Formative assessments (used ongoing) are they better with technology?  Overall, the formative assessments got better throughout the school year. Devices prompt you to take action. Math teachers used the data to design math instruction like they do for reading. The data helped them do small centers and math groups. The children were not where they needed to be in the instructional program. It was apparent from using the diagnostic assessments that they need more interventions and diagnosis. Immediate results with technology are important to assist the teacher in understanding where the student is in understanding Math, but it is also important for the teacher to know what to do next. Teacher Academy is helping with this issue. At this time the diagnostic devices are being used with struggling students and they have not had time to work with any of the other students. Assessments are very objective and factual and it guides instruction. Concerns were raised about the time needed to do instruction for struggling children, by themselves in the classroom (no assistants). Time management is an issue. The technology is an issue when it didn’t work either the hardware or the software. Teachers are technology illiterate and they need help troubleshoot technical problems. They are asking for continued support from consultants. The Principal is also critical for the success of this program in providing support to teachers in scheduling and understanding the assessments. A question was raised regarding the fiscal note for expanding the program to all elementary schools across the state. The diagnostic tools including, training, technology-hardware, and software, is $25 million for K-3 statewide.   

  • GCS 9 American Diploma Project (SDP) Algebra II Results for Spring 2010 and Consortium Participation Discussion for 2011 The State Board is requested to provide guidance on the continued involvement of North Carolina in this initiative. Nine of the Consortium states participated in the Algebra II exam, including North Carolina. The test was administered to more than 40,000 students, nationally. A summary of NC’s Spring 2010 participation and 2011 plans will be reviewed. NC’s average scaled score in 2009 was 1,055 and in 2010, 1,058. This score indicates students are still in need of preparation of Algebra II. The overall Consortium score in 2009 was 1,032 and in 2010 1,024. NC had only 14-16 percent of students prepared and 4-5 percent well prepared, while the remaining 81-82 percent are still in need of preparation.

Board Meeting: Dr. Fabrizio said we can’t compare NC data except with Arkansas and Hawaii. NC had the highest mean score and the highest percentages of students prepared in the Consortium. This was the third year for NC and the question is should we continue, with such a weak comparison. Dr. Harrison said NC should continue for another year and expend the $100,000 to participate.

State Board of Career and Technical Education

  • GCS 10 Project Management Credential-New NC Career and Technical Education (CTE) and Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) Initiative The State Board is requested to consider development of this credential in 2010-2011, pilot test 2011-2012, field test 2012-2013, Standard Course of Study 2012-2013, CTE Technical Attainment 2013-2014. North Carolina is a member of a 12-state Consortium in which each state will develop and exchange a series of four courses in an emerging career-focused field. The NC Series is Project Management (180 countries-Western Carolina and NC State and Community Colleges within specific courses). This will be offered through specific courses in NC. Students can earn the certified Associates Degree in Project Management and Microsoft Project software certificate. This will help the students in their post secondary education and careers.

Board Meeting: Rebecca Payne presented the various programs being developed by some of the other states. Develop a product, cost benefit plan, prototype and work within the course. Work with the schools and train them in project management.

21st Century Professionals

  • TCP 3 2010 Teacher Working Conditions Survey The TWC was conducted in March/April 2010. Further information about the findings from the survey was presented

Board Meeting: Carolyn McKinney attended each of the regional school board training sessions where she learned many local board members do not know about the Teacher Working Conditions Website or http://ncteachingconditions..org

Eric Hirsch reported working conditions do have an impact on student achievement. There is a clear correlation between working conditions and student achievement. Two findings (5th version) from the TWC show teacher leadership is important as well as facility resources. Managing student conduct and community support confirm this link and this is seen even in the highest performing schools. In the lowest performing schools only half agree that parents helping at the school impacts student success. Managing student conduct correlates very well with student success. Leadership support also correlates with student success in the best schools. There are specific questions where there are major differences in the answers to questions between the struggling and successful schools. In the latest review of the TWC it was learned that managing student conduct was the most important issue and significant issue in judging student achievement in the school. Working conditions showed higher achievement in the high schools than middle and elementary schools. Students are achieving at higher levels where student conduct is good and teachers feel safe, and safe school policies are in place. Check out the website for more information.

Consent Agenda

Globally Competitive Students

  • GCS 11 Title III AMAO Status Report for 2009-2010 The State Board APPROVED by consent a Summary Report of the LEAs receiving Title III funds to meet as series of AMAO (Annual Measurable Objectives) targets. The three objectives include: 1) percent of students who demonstrate progress in at least one of the subtests on the required state identified English Language proficiency test, 2) annual increase in the percentage of students identified as limited English proficient who attain proficiency on required state tests, 3) percent of student in the LEP subgroup meeting its AYP targets. LEAs that do not meet AMAO targets two years in a row will be required to develop a detailed improvement plan as required by NCLB. Twelve districts including most, if not all, of the largest urban districts have missed the AMAOs four consecutive years or more. Wake, Charlotte, Guilford, Forsyth, Durham, Buncombe, and Cumberland are part of the list of the LEAs who have missed targets four consecutive years. If the Title III subgrantee (LEAs) fail to meet AMAO targets four consecutive years, the State Board of Education shall require all Title III groups to modify the curriculum, program, or method of instruction. The complete list of LEAs who missed two, three and four consecutive years can be found in the Executive Summary link at the beginning of this preview.

Board Meeting: No Discussion.

Business/Finance and Advocacy

  • TCS 6 LEA-Wide Calendar Waiver Requests The State Board of Education APPROVED calendar waivers for 21 LEAs listed in the Executive Summary by consent. The majority of the Districts are from the western part of the state. The LEAs must meet the criteria of being closed two or more hours, eight or more days of school, in four of the last ten years. The law was modified slightly last year to assist several LEAs who had partial days due to snow. All of these LEAs are recommended for approval by consent.

Board Meeting: No Discussion.

Board Meeting and Committee Chair Reports

Action and Discussion Agenda

Superintendent’s Report

  • Dr. June Atkinson highlighted the graduation achievement award luncheon. Award presented to DPI from First Century Skills, to recognize work on NC FALCON.

Chairman’s Remarks

  • Dr. Bill Harrison, Chairman read the Resolution on Hurst versus Hammocks Beach Corporation was read by the Chairman. In 1950, Dr. Sharpe deeded 810 acres of coastal property in Onslow County NC, known as “The Hammocks” to the nonprofit Hammocks Beach Corporation in trust for recreational and educational purposes for the use and benefit of the members of the NC Teachers Association. A jury has found that it is impossible to use the trust property and land for the purposes specified and is removing Hammocks Beach Corporation as trustee and appointing the NC State Board of Education as substitute trustee. The SBE voted to approve the Resolution and thereby accepting trusteeship of the property.
  • On another matter a letter has been sent regarding a GED plus recommendation from Hilda Pinnix Ragland whereby16-18 year-olds must take career skill course and SBE should endorse.

Adjourn

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