2010 LEGISLATIVE SESSION MEMO #8

June 28th, 2010

The House and Senate returned on Monday and progress began again on the budget.

it gets where it’s going..

No Graduation Project required legislation was ratified and sent to the Governor. This issue had become a bone of contention with many LEAs who had to find local resources to implement and manage the project for all high school students.

House Committees

Education:

SB 1141 Task Force on Sports Injuries in Schools Favorable Report Re-ref to Com on Rules

SB 1151 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Favorable Report Re-ref Com on Health

SB 1152 Study Child Nutrition Program Not Heard

SB 1198 Education Cabinet Est. STEM Priority Favorable Report Placed on Cal 6/23/10

SB 1244 SBOE Members Ex Officio to Econ. Dev. Comm. Favorable Report Placed on Cal 6/23/10

SB 1246 Four-Year Cohort Graduation Rate Not Heard

SB 1392 State Health Plans Court Ordered Guardianships Not Heard

HB 1682 Corp Punish for Children w/Disabilities Withdrawn from Com Re-ref Com on Education

HB 1726 Improve Child Care Nutrition/Activity Standards Favorable Report Placed on Cal for 6/24

Health:

SB 1151 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Favorable Report Re-ref to Com on Health

House Floor

SB 1141 Task Force on Sports Injuries in Schools Favorable Report Re-ref to Com on Rules

SB 1151 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Favorable Report Re-ref Com on Health

SB 1152 Study Child Nutrition Program Not Heard

SB 1198 Education Cabinet Est. STEM Priority Passed 2nd and 3rd Reading

SB 1244 State Board of Education Members Ex Officio to Economic Dev Comm. Passed 2nd Reading

SB 1246 Four-Year Cohort Graduation Rate Not Heard

HB 961 Pay to Play Regulation Adopted (Changes title) Gov’t Ethics and Campaign Reform Act of 2010

HB 1683 Amend Sunset/Children with Disabilities Withdrawn Rules; Cal 6/24

HB 1726 Improve Child Care Nutrition/Activity Standards Favorable Report Placed on Cal for 6/24

HB 1921 Wake E-mail Address Lists/Electronic Access Passed 2nd and 3rd Reading

HB 1973 Keep North Carolina Competitive Act Passed

Senate Committees

Education:

HB 901 Honors Courses in Healthful Living Classes Favorable Report

HB 1676 Substitute Teacher Unemployment Favorable Report

HB 1753 School Bus Railroad Crossing Exception Favorable Report

SB 1115 Carteret Schools May Administer Oath Favorable Report Proposed Committee Substitute (PCS)

SB 1199 NC Biotechnology and Agriscience School Favorable Report Proposed Committee Substitute (PCS)

Health:

SB 1151 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

Pensions & Retirement & Aging:

HB 1998 Reciprocity for ORP Service Favorable Report

HB 2054 Retirement Technical Corrections Favorable Report

SB 1392 State Health Plan/Court-Ordered Guardianships Favorable Report

Judiciary I:

HB 961 Gov’t Ethics and Campaign Reform Act of 2010 Re-ref Judiciary I

State and Local Government:

HB 1666 Davie School Board

HB 1772 Cherokee School Board Terms

Senate Floor

HB 901 Honors Courses in Healthful Living Classes Favorable Report

HB 961 Gov’t Ethics and Campaign Reform Act of 2010 Re-ref Judiciary I

HB 1669 Require Use of EVAAS in Schools Amendment adds language comparable and compatible. SBE is required to approve any other software programs.  Passed 2nd and 3rd Reading

HB 1676 Substitute Teacher Unemployment Favorable Report

HB 1683 Amend Sunset/Children with Disabilities Withdrawn Rules; Cal 6/24

HB 1753 School Bus Railroad Crossing Exception Passed 2nd and 3rd Reading

HB 1998 Reciprocity for ORP Service Favorable Report

SB 66 Comprehensive Arts Education Plan Passed 2nd and 3rd reading.

SB 1115 Carteret Schools May Administer Oath Favorable Report Re-ref to Com on Judiciary II

SB 1198 Education Cabinet Est. STEM Priority Passed 2nd and 3rd Reading

SB 1199 NC Biotechnology and Agriscience School Adopted (Changes Title) Est. Regional School Planning Comm.

SB 1244 SBOE Members Ex Officio to Econ. Dev. Comm. Passed 2nd Reading

SB 1264 Cherokee School Board Terms Withdrawn Cal; Cal 6/24

SB 1392 State Health Plan/Court-Ordered Guardianships Favorable Report

What’s Up Next Week

HB 1666 Davie School Board

HB 1772 Cherokee School Board Terms

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2007-2008 DPI DROPOUT REPORT

 

Follow the link below to download the full report in pdf format:

THE FULL 2007-2008 DPI DROPOUT REPORT

 

General Findings

 

  1. High schools in North Carolina reported a dropout rate of 4.97%, a decrease from the 5.24% rate reported from the previous year. 

 

  1. Grades 9-12 reported 22,434 dropouts in 2007-2008. Each grade 9-12 reported a decrease from 2006-07. There are decreases in 57% (66 of 115) of the Local Education Agencies (LEAs), accounting for a reduction in 1,898 dropouts.

 

  1. Dropout Rates:
    • LEAs reporting the lowest dropout rates are Chapel Hill-Carrboro, Dare, Newton Conover City, Elkin City, Mt. Airy City, Hertford, Yadkin, Guilford, Union, and Iredell-Statesville.

(dropout rates from 1.53 to 3.53)

  1.  
    • LEAs reporting the highest dropout rates are Hickory City, Jackson, Swain, Madison, Mitchell, Yancey, Roanoke Rapids City, Kannapolis City, Granville, and Edgecombe.

(dropout rates from 6.83 to 8.65)

  1.  
    • The largest 3-year decreases in grades 9-12 dropout rates are located in *Hertford, *Dare, Jones, *Graham and *Burke. 

*dropout rate below the state average

  1.  
    • LEAs with the largest 3-year rate increases were *Hyde, Charlotte-Mecklenburg, *Washington, Thomasville City, and *Moore. 

*dropout rate below the state average

 

  1. Dropout Count:
    • The 22,434 dropouts recorded in grades 9-12 represented a 4.7% decrease from the 23,550 reported in 2006-2007. 
    • The largest 3-year decreases in dropout count for grades 9-12 are found in *Burke, *Durham, Robeson, Lee, and Vance.

*dropout rate below the state average

  1.  
    • LEAs with the largest 3-year dropout increases are Charlotte-Mecklenburg, *Wake, Forsyth, *Guilford, and *Johnston.

*dropout rate below the state average

 

  1. Gender,  Race, and Age: 

All ethnic groups, except Multiracial, contributed to the decrease in the number of reported dropouts.  The dropout rate for American Indian students declined for the fourth consecutive year.  Males accounted for 59.7% of the reported dropouts.  The number of students dropping out of school at ages 15, 16, and 17 decreased, while the number dropping out at ages 18, 19, and 20 increased.

 

  1. Reason Codes: 

For the fourth consecutive year, there is an increase in the “Enrollment in a Community College” dropout reason code. Attendance issues are again the reason most often noted for a reported dropout, accounting for almost half of all dropouts.

 

 

 

Joint Legislative Commission on Dropout Prevention and High School Graduation

FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Based upon the various presentations and Commission discussion, the Joint Legislative Commission on Dropout Prevention and High School Graduation makes the following findings: 

§  Innovative and non-traditional high school designs strengthen the retention of students in schools and reduce failure rates.  North Carolina high schools that implemented reform/redesign models showed improved performance on 2007-2008 End-of-Course tests.

§  At-risk students are less likely to drop out if they form an on-going relationship with a designated adult in the schools who consistently shows concern and provides personal attention in helping at-risk students address their academic or personal problems and assists them in staying on track for graduation.

§  Current law requires children to attend school between the ages of seven and 16.   In 2006-2007, students aged 17 were the most frequent dropouts.  The next highest age group of dropouts were students aged 18, followed by students aged 16.

§  A student’s successful transition to and positive academic progress in 9th Grade are pivotal factors in the likelihood that the student will be promoted to 10th Grade and will graduate in a timely manner.

§  In North Carolina in 2006-2007, students dropped out more frequently during 9th Grade than any other grade.

§  Student suspension rates in North Carolina have been on the rise in recent years and students who are suspended from school are three times more likely to drop out than other students.

§  The presence of the following risk factors increase a student’s likelihood of failing to complete their high school education: multiple tardies, poor attendance, lack of parent involvement and support, multiple suspensions, low grades and lack of academic success, and being a pregnant or parenting teen.

§  High-quality preschool programs are important to help at-risk students enter school healthy and ready to achieve high academic performance.  Reading at grade level by Grade 3 is a key predictor of high school completion and early intervention programs that promote literacy in the early elementary years are important.

§  The Commission heard from the Committee on Dropout Prevention that the availability of Dropout Prevention Grants has stimulated significant interest across the State. Hundreds of groups, including local school systems, schools, nonprofits, faith-based organizations, and colleges, have proposed a variety of innovative programs and initiatives. These proposals have been designed to address unique local needs, supplement local resources, and build upon collaborative efforts in order to keep students in school and on track for high school graduation. The Commission is hopeful that the planned evaluation of the funded proposals will identify successful practices that can be sustained locally and can be replicated in other locations.

§  The Commission finds that it is premature to develop a network for sharing best practices among grant recipients, the public schools and other interested organizations. The Commission recommends such a network be developed after there is data available from the grant recipients that documents practices that have proven to be successful in reducing the dropout rate and increasing the graduation rate. The Commission also encourages the Department of Public Instruction, as a part of its technical support to grant recipients, to assist in the development of this network.

§  Graduation rates should be a key factor used in accountability systems that measure and reward a school’s efforts to improve student academic performance and close achievement gaps.

§  The Commission finds that the percentage of North Carolina students who completed their high school education in four years or less in 2008 was slightly less than 70%.  The Commission believes that aggressive goals which demonstrate continuous and substantial improvement from the prior year should be set to improve the current four year cohort graduation rate. 

Therefore, the Commission makes the following recommendations to the 2009 General Assembly:

The General Assembly shall appropriate funds for the 11 Learn and Earn early college high schools that received a planning grant in the 2008-2009 fiscal year and are ready to begin operations in the 2009-2010 school year. (See LEGISLATIVE PROPOSAL I)

The General Assembly shall appropriate funds for Communities in Schools of North Carolina, Inc. to place no fewer than 100 graduation coaches in either middle or high schools and give priority to schools that have a 4-year cohort graduation rate of less than 65%. (See LEGISLATIVE PROPOSAL II)

The General Assembly shall direct the Board of Governors of The University of North Carolina, in conjunction with the Department of Public Instruction and the North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities, to direct the appropriate entity to study raising the compulsory attendance age for public school attendance prior to completion of a high school diploma from sixteen to seventeen or eighteen. At a minimum, the study shall examine other states that have raised the compulsory attendance age to determine all impacts, including the effect on the dropout rate and the fiscal impact. (See LEGISLATIVE PROPOSAL III)

The General Assembly shall encourage local boards of education to adopt policies to encourage local businesses to adopt personnel policies to permit parents to attend student conferences, implement programs that assist students in making a successful transition between the middle school and high school years, increase parental involvement in student achievement, reduce suspension and expulsion rates and encourage academic progress during suspensions, and provide assistance and support to encourage pregnant and parenting students to graduate. (See LEGISLATIVE PROPOSAL IV)

The General Assembly shall appropriate sufficient funds for Dropout Prevention Grants in the 2009 Session to continue some of the more successful initiatives and also to provide the opportunity for a new round of proposals to be funded.

The Commission strongly recommends the following:

·      Prior to the 2009-2010 school year, the State Board of Education develop a growth model establishing annual goals for continuous and substantial improvement in the cohort graduation rate by local school administrative units.

·      The State Board establish as a short term goal that local school administrative units meet the annual growth model goals for improvement in the cohort graduation rate beginning with the graduating class of 2010 and continuing annually thereafter. 

·      The State Board establish as a long-term goal a statewide four year cohort graduation rate of ninety percent by 2015. 

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